International Journal of Yoga

SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 239--246

Sudarshan Kriya Yoga program in posttraumatic stress disorder: A feasibility study


Kamini Vasudev1, Emily Ionson3, Samin Inam2, Mark Speechley3, Sumit Chaudhari4, Sheena Ghodasara4, Ronnie I Newman5, Akshya Vasudev1 
1 Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University; Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre; Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Care, Parkwood Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care London; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada
2 Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich Interfaculty Program in Public Health, Western University, London, ON, Canada
4 Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University; Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
5 Department of Research and Health Promotion, International Association of Human Values, Washington, DC; Health Professions Division, Lifelong Learning Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Kamini Vasudev
A2-513, Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, N6A5W9
Canada

Background: Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY), a breath-based yoga intervention, has demonstrated safety and efficacy in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients subsequent to natural disaster or war, but has not been explored in civilians with PTSD from a wider range of trauma. We hypothesized that it would be feasible to conduct a clinical trial of SKY in PTSD resulting from a wide range of trauma. Methods: Outcomes were feasibility measures including rates of enrollment and retention, adherence to study protocol; as well as changes in PTSD symptoms, other mood symptoms, and physiological measures. Male and female participants aged 18–75 years were enrolled in a feasibility trial. They attended a 6-day learning phase of SKY followed by 7 sessions over 11 weeks as an adjunct to their usual treatment. Results: Forty-seven participants were screened and 32 were enrolled over 9 months. Consistent with retention rates of other PTSD trials, 13 withdrew from the study prior to week 12. Twenty-one participants met intervention attendance requirements, completed 95% of planned study assessments and were included in final analyses. Participants experienced clinically significant decrease in PTSD symptoms on the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist (PCL-5) scores at week 12 mean difference, Mdiff (standard deviation [SD]) = −10.68 (14.03), P = 0.004; Cohen's d = 0.58, which was sustained at week 24 Mdiff (SD) = −16.11 (15.20), P < 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.91. Conclusions: It is possible to conduct a clinical trial of SKY in a routine psychiatry clinic serving patients with PTSD due to a wide range of trauma. Future studies should include an RCT design.


How to cite this article:
Vasudev K, Ionson E, Inam S, Speechley M, Chaudhari S, Ghodasara S, Newman RI, Vasudev A. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga program in posttraumatic stress disorder: A feasibility study.Int J Yoga 2020;13:239-246


How to cite this URL:
Vasudev K, Ionson E, Inam S, Speechley M, Chaudhari S, Ghodasara S, Newman RI, Vasudev A. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga program in posttraumatic stress disorder: A feasibility study. Int J Yoga [serial online] 2020 [cited 2022 Aug 11 ];13:239-246
Available from: https://www.ijoy.org.in/article.asp?issn=0973-6131;year=2020;volume=13;issue=3;spage=239;epage=246;aulast=Vasudev;type=0