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SHORT COMMUNICATION Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 239-246
Sudarshan Kriya Yoga program in posttraumatic stress disorder: A feasibility study


1 Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University; Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre; Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Care, Parkwood Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care London; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada
2 Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre; Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Care, Parkwood Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care London; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada
3 Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich Interfaculty Program in Public Health, Western University, London, ON, Canada
5 Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University; Department of Psychiatry, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
6 Department of Research and Health Promotion, International Association of Human Values, Washington, DC; Health Professions Division, Lifelong Learning Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Kamini Vasudev
A2-513, Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, N6A5W9
Canada
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijoy.IJOY_16_20

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Background: Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY), a breath-based yoga intervention, has demonstrated safety and efficacy in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients subsequent to natural disaster or war, but has not been explored in civilians with PTSD from a wider range of trauma. We hypothesized that it would be feasible to conduct a clinical trial of SKY in PTSD resulting from a wide range of trauma. Methods: Outcomes were feasibility measures including rates of enrollment and retention, adherence to study protocol; as well as changes in PTSD symptoms, other mood symptoms, and physiological measures. Male and female participants aged 18–75 years were enrolled in a feasibility trial. They attended a 6-day learning phase of SKY followed by 7 sessions over 11 weeks as an adjunct to their usual treatment. Results: Forty-seven participants were screened and 32 were enrolled over 9 months. Consistent with retention rates of other PTSD trials, 13 withdrew from the study prior to week 12. Twenty-one participants met intervention attendance requirements, completed 95% of planned study assessments and were included in final analyses. Participants experienced clinically significant decrease in PTSD symptoms on the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist (PCL-5) scores at week 12 mean difference, Mdiff (standard deviation [SD]) = −10.68 (14.03), P = 0.004; Cohen's d = 0.58, which was sustained at week 24 Mdiff (SD) = −16.11 (15.20), P < 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.91. Conclusions: It is possible to conduct a clinical trial of SKY in a routine psychiatry clinic serving patients with PTSD due to a wide range of trauma. Future studies should include an RCT design.


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