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 Indian J Med Microbiol  
 

Figure 2: (a) This depicts the mean Acugraph3 readings for 28 subjects of both genders for each of the 24 Jing-Well acupoints before and after a 3 week yoga-lifestyle course for novice yoga students. Note that the upper, dashed line representing the post-course readings is well separated from the lower, continuous line representing the pre-course readings. From this, a sign test rejects the null hypothesis by a value of P = 10-24 << 0.000001. For individual meridians, the standard deviations of the readings for each meridian are as shown, together with corresponding P values along the axis of the graph. (b) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for the 18 ladies attending the 3-week yoga-lifestyle course. The same comments and statistics apply as in Figure 1a. Despite the small numbers, levels of statistical significance suggest that the results can be considered qualitatively robust. (c) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for the 11 men attending the yoga-lifestyle course. In this case pre and post data are very close at three points, but the statistics are still decisively against the null hypothesis (P = 0.00012). Overall Figure 2 a-c leave little room for doubt that well-conducted yoga-lifestyle programs will improve electrodermal measures of acumeridian energies. (d) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for each of the 24 Jing-Well acupoints for the 28 novice yoga course participants after 3 weeks yoga-lifestyle training (continuous line), compared to 20 experienced practitioners with more than 6 months participation in yoga-lifestyle programs (dashed line). Note that the overall means are very close (87.82/87.65 Table 2a), and that while the dashed line is relatively level, there are far greater departures from the mean by the dashed line (SD's 23.04 vs 10.46) [Table 2b]. The F-statistic of 4.852, P = 0.0004 [Table 2b], indicates that experienced yoga practitioners have more balanced acumeridian systems suggesting better regulation of corresponding organs and organ systems

Figure 2: (a) This depicts the mean Acugraph3 readings for 28 subjects of both genders for each of the 24 Jing-Well acupoints before and after a 3 week yoga-lifestyle course for novice yoga students. Note that the upper, dashed line representing the post-course readings is well separated from the lower, continuous line representing the pre-course readings. From this, a sign test rejects the null hypothesis by a value of P = 10-24 << 0.000001. For individual meridians, the standard deviations of the readings for each meridian are as shown, together with corresponding P values along the axis of the graph. (b) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for the 18 ladies attending the 3-week yoga-lifestyle course. The same comments and statistics apply as in Figure 1a. Despite the small numbers, levels of statistical significance suggest that the results can be considered qualitatively robust. (c) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for the 11 men attending the yoga-lifestyle course. In this case pre and post data are very close at three points, but the statistics are still decisively against the null hypothesis (P = 0.00012). Overall Figure 2 a-c leave little room for doubt that well-conducted yoga-lifestyle programs will improve electrodermal measures of acumeridian energies. (d) This depicts the mean AcuGraph3 readings for each of the 24 Jing-Well acupoints for the 28 novice yoga course participants after 3 weeks yoga-lifestyle training (continuous line), compared to 20 experienced practitioners with more than 6 months participation in yoga-lifestyle programs (dashed line). Note that the overall means are very close (87.82/87.65 Table 2a), and that while the dashed line is relatively level, there are far greater departures from the mean by the dashed line (SD's 23.04 vs 10.46) [Table 2b]. The F-statistic of 4.852, P = 0.0004 [Table 2b], indicates that experienced yoga practitioners have more balanced acumeridian systems suggesting better regulation of corresponding organs and organ systems