International Journal of Yoga
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 103-113
The daily influences of yoga on relational outcomes off of the mat


1 College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
2 College of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA
3 Department of Human Movement Studies, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech

Correspondence Address:
Mo; Kishida
500N, 3rd Street, Health South Building 323, Arizona State University, Phoenix 85002, Arizona
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijoy.IJOY_46_18

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Background: Despite the wide array of health benefits that have been evidenced with yoga, a clear gap exists examining how yoga impacts connections with oneself and to others. Aims: The objectives of the present study were twofold: (1) to describe the day-to-day (in)variability in daily yoga practice and relational outcomes and (2) to examine the direct and indirect effects of yoga practice on relational outcomes. Methods: Community-dwelling yoga practitioners (n = 104, age range: 18–76 years) with a yoga practice of at least once a week were recruited for a 21-day daily diary study. Practitioners were asked to complete daily Internet surveys at the end of the day which included questions with respect to one's yoga practice and relational domains (i.e., mindfulness, [self-]compassion, and social connectedness). Results: Multilevel analyses revealed yoga and relational outcomes to be dynamic phenomena, indicated by substantial variation (intraclass correlations = 0.34–0.48) at the within-person level. On days when an individual practiced more yoga than their usual, greater mindfulness (b = 2.93, standard error [SE] = 0.39, P < 0.05) and self-compassion (b = 1.45, SE = 0.46, P < 0.05) were also reported. 1-1-1 multilevel mediation models demonstrated that yoga has an indirect effect on both compassion and social connectedness through increases in mindfulness at the within- and between-person levels. In models testing self-compassion as the mediator, the indirect effect of daily yoga practice on compassion was significant, although limited to the within-person level. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a routine yoga practice could positively impact how a practitioner relates to theirselves and to others, both on a day-to-day basis, and with accumulated practice.


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