International Journal of Yoga
Users online: 341 
Ahead of print | Login 
 
Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size 
About us Editors Current Issue Past Issues Instructions submission Subscribe Advertise


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27-4
Long-term effect of yogic practices on diurnal metabolic rates of healthy subjects


1 Department of Life Sciences, Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (VYASA), Bangalore, India
2 Vyasa (Swami Vivekananda Yoga University), Prasanti Kuteeram, Jigani, Bangalore Dist-560 019, India

Correspondence Address:
M S Chaya
Department of life sciences, Vyasa (Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana) (A Deemed Yoga University), #45/3, KV layout, 2nd cross, 4th block east, Jayanagar, Bangalore 560019
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-6131.36761

Rights and Permissions

Background : The metabolic rate is an indicator of autonomic activity. Reduced sympathetic arousal probably resulting in hypometabolic states has been reported in several yogic studies. Aim : The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of yoga training on diurnal metabolic rates in yoga practitioners at two different times of the day (at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.). Materials and Methods : Eighty eight healthy volunteers were selected and their metabolic rates assessed at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. using an indirect calorimeter at a yoga school in Bangalore, India. Results and conclusions: The results show that the average metabolic rate of the yoga group was 12% lower than that of the non-yoga group ( P < 0.001) measured at 9 p.m. and 16% lower at 6 a.m. ( P < 0.001). The 9 p.m. metabolic rates of the yoga group were almost equal to their predicted basal metabolic rates (BMRs) whereas the metabolic rate was significantly higher than the predicted BMR for the non-yoga group. The 6 a.m. metabolic rate was comparable to their predicted BMR in the non-yoga group whereas it was much lower in the yoga group ( P < 0.001). The lower metabolic rates in the yoga group at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. may be due to coping strategies for day-to-day stress, decreased sympathetic nervous system activity and probably, a stable autonomic nervous system response (to different stressors) achieved due to training in yoga.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article  Email this article
    

  Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
  Related articles
   Citation Manager
  Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4731    
    Printed367    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded286    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal